historicaltimes
An opium den in Chinatown, New York, 1925. The product originated in India, was refined for smoking purposes in China, and arrived in the U.S. via San Francisco. In the 1880s, Dr. H.H. Kane wrote that opium dens were venues “where all nationalities seem indiscriminately mixed.” 
historicaltimes:

American Patrons Smoking Opium in an Opium Den, Chinatown, New York, 1925.

An opium den in Chinatown, New York, 1925. The product originated in India, was refined for smoking purposes in China, and arrived in the U.S. via San Francisco. In the 1880s, Dr. H.H. Kane wrote that opium dens were venues “where all nationalities seem indiscriminately mixed.” 

historicaltimes:

American Patrons Smoking Opium in an Opium Den, Chinatown, New York, 1925.

Africa is notoriously repressive for members of the LGBT community. But as this disturbing piece in the Daily Beast makes clear, American organizations are helping stoke the hate.
Campus Crusade for Christ (aka ‘Cru’) — one of the largest charity groups in the U.S. — encourages a virulently homophobic agenda in Africa. At one of its conferences, in Lagos, Nigeria, a speaker, Dr. Seyoum Antonios was introduced to the crowd by a senior executive in CCC:

Among the takeaways from Antonios’s presentation: Thirty-three percent of homosexuals are pedophiles, gay couples are coming to Africa to steal children and turn them homosexual, homosexuality is a Western plot to kill Africans, and gay people are 15 times more likely to be murderers than straight people. Fortunately, Antonios said, Ethiopia will become a “graveyard for homosexuality.”

Read “The Christian Do-Gooders Secretly Attacking Gays”
Map credit ILGA (from 2011)

Africa is notoriously repressive for members of the LGBT community. But as this disturbing piece in the Daily Beast makes clear, American organizations are helping stoke the hate.

Campus Crusade for Christ (aka ‘Cru’) — one of the largest charity groups in the U.S. — encourages a virulently homophobic agenda in Africa. At one of its conferences, in Lagos, Nigeria, a speaker, Dr. Seyoum Antonios was introduced to the crowd by a senior executive in CCC:

Among the takeaways from Antonios’s presentation: Thirty-three percent of homosexuals are pedophiles, gay couples are coming to Africa to steal children and turn them homosexual, homosexuality is a Western plot to kill Africans, and gay people are 15 times more likely to be murderers than straight people. Fortunately, Antonios said, Ethiopia will become a “graveyard for homosexuality.”

Read “The Christian Do-Gooders Secretly Attacking Gays”

Map credit ILGA (from 2011)

theuppitynegras

Islam in America is rapidly expanding. It is the fastest-growing religion in the nation, and the second most practiced faith in twenty states. These demographic shifts prompted a prominent Los Angeles-based imam to comment, “Ramadan is a new American tradition.” The cleric’s forward-looking pronouncement marks Islam’s recent arrival in the US. However, this statement reveals a pathology afflicting a lot of Muslim Americans today - an inability to look back and embrace the opening chapters of Muslim American history written by enslaved African Muslims.

Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or, “[a]s many as 600,000 to 1.2 million slaves” in antebellum America were Muslims. 46 percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa’s western regions, which boasted “significant numbers of Muslims”.

These enslaved Muslims strove to meet the demands of their faith, most notably the Ramadan fast, prayers, and community meals, in the face of comprehensive slave codes that linked religious activity to insubordination and rebellion. Marking Ramadan as a “new American tradition” not only overlooks the holy month observed by enslaved Muslims many years ago, but also perpetuates their erasure from Muslim-American history.

I scored last-minute tickets to Dave Chappelle tomorrow night — the last in a series of 10 shows at Radio City. Feels a little unreal. I hardly ever go for live comedy shows and yet here I am, about to see one of the greatest comics of all time. From Vulture:

When I enter, I’m instantly and surprisingly overwhelmed with emotion. With a jazz trio called Supa Lowery Bros at the top of the stairs, playing an instrumental version of Kendrick Lamar’s oddly appropriate “Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe,” I’m taken by how incredibly eclectic and buzzing the crowd is. I’m not exaggerating when I say it is the most diverse room I’ve ever been in. It looks like the streets of New York City were moved inside. It looks like the cast of Orange Is the New Black if it were half male and everyone were allowed to wear their cutest outfits (and not just because I eventually sat two seats down from Natasha Lyonne). A young Asian guy wearing a hat with the New Yorker logo on it stands in line in front of a white guy in a Twiztid hat, an Indian guy in a suit, an African-American skater in a Obey hat, and a woman in dreads who was talking to a woman with a feather in her hair. This is why Chappelle’s run of ten shows needed to be here, at Radio City. It’s big enough that I could see how wide-reaching his fan base is, but not so big (like Madison Square Garden would’ve been) that we turned into a faceless blob just moving in and out of passageways. With the band now playing a jazzed-up version of a Kanye West song, it is all reminiscent of Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Chappelle’s 2006 concert documentary, which the comedian called the “best day of my career.”

But here’s the most interesting part…

Chappelle didn’t quit because he was crazy; he quit because he was sane, and he knew his audience was getting crazy. So, like a war of attrition, intentionally or not, Chappelle weeded the bad element out. After ten years, gone were the racists, the idiots, the bandwagon-jumpers, the people who shouted, “I’m Rick James, bitch” for no apparent reason. All the signs saying “NO heckling” weren’t necessary at Radio City. After a privately “pretty fucking good” and publicly tumultuous decade, the audience was most definitely ready to laugh with him.

I scored last-minute tickets to Dave Chappelle tomorrow night — the last in a series of 10 shows at Radio City. Feels a little unreal. I hardly ever go for live comedy shows and yet here I am, about to see one of the greatest comics of all time. From Vulture:

When I enter, I’m instantly and surprisingly overwhelmed with emotion. With a jazz trio called Supa Lowery Bros at the top of the stairs, playing an instrumental version of Kendrick Lamar’s oddly appropriate “Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe,” I’m taken by how incredibly eclectic and buzzing the crowd is. I’m not exaggerating when I say it is the most diverse room I’ve ever been in. It looks like the streets of New York City were moved inside. It looks like the cast of Orange Is the New Black if it were half male and everyone were allowed to wear their cutest outfits (and not just because I eventually sat two seats down from Natasha Lyonne). A young Asian guy wearing a hat with the New Yorker logo on it stands in line in front of a white guy in a Twiztid hat, an Indian guy in a suit, an African-American skater in a Obey hat, and a woman in dreads who was talking to a woman with a feather in her hair. This is why Chappelle’s run of ten shows needed to be here, at Radio City. It’s big enough that I could see how wide-reaching his fan base is, but not so big (like Madison Square Garden would’ve been) that we turned into a faceless blob just moving in and out of passageways. With the band now playing a jazzed-up version of a Kanye West song, it is all reminiscent of Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Chappelle’s 2006 concert documentary, which the comedian called the “best day of my career.”

But here’s the most interesting part…

Chappelle didn’t quit because he was crazy; he quit because he was sane, and he knew his audience was getting crazy. So, like a war of attrition, intentionally or not, Chappelle weeded the bad element out. After ten years, gone were the racists, the idiots, the bandwagon-jumpers, the people who shouted, “I’m Rick James, bitch” for no apparent reason. All the signs saying “NO heckling” weren’t necessary at Radio City. After a privately “pretty fucking good” and publicly tumultuous decade, the audience was most definitely ready to laugh with him.

"Yet with few exceptions, Latino participation in mainstream-English language media is stunningly low. A review of the top movies and television programs reveals that there is a narrower range of stories and roles, and fewer Latino lead actors in the entertainment industry today, than there were seventy years ago. Likewise, whereas the Latino population grew more than 43% from 2000 to 2010, the rate of media participation—behind and in front of the camera, and across all genres and formats—stayed stagnant or grew only slightly, at times proportionally declining. Even further, when Latinos are visible, they tend to be portrayed through decades-old stereotypes as criminals, law enforcers, cheap labor, and hypersexualized beings.” [The Latino Media Gap]

"Yet with few exceptions, Latino participation in mainstream-English language media is stunningly low. A review of the top movies and television programs reveals that there is a narrower range of stories and roles, and fewer Latino lead actors in the entertainment industry today, than there were seventy years ago. Likewise, whereas the Latino population grew more than 43% from 2000 to 2010, the rate of media participation—behind and in front of the camera, and across all genres and formats—stayed stagnant or grew only slightly, at times proportionally declining. Even further, when Latinos are visible, they tend to be portrayed through decades-old stereotypes as criminals, law enforcers, cheap labor, and hypersexualized beings.” [The Latino Media Gap]

feetin2worlds
feetin2worlds:

Without #Immigration, Half of the U.S. #WorldCup Soccer Team Disappears…
The U.S. national soccer team plays its first World Cup game on Monday against Ghana.
For a country where immigration reform is a such a hot button issue, it’s interesting to note that more than half of the team was born outside the U.S. or have parents who are immigrants.
This year’s team also has a particularly German influence. John Brooks, Timmy Chandler, Julian Green, Jermaine Jones, Fabian Johnson — all were either born in Germany or have a German parent.
There are also four players who are Latino and two players who are Native American. Chris Wondolowski of the Kiowa tribe and and SBNation.com identified DeAndre Yedlin as black, Native American and Latvian.
Read the full story here: http://soccer.fusion.net/2014/06/16/without-immigration-half-of-the-u-s-world-cup-soccer-team-disappears/

feetin2worlds:

Without #Immigration, Half of the U.S. #WorldCup Soccer Team Disappears…

The U.S. national soccer team plays its first World Cup game on Monday against Ghana.

For a country where immigration reform is a such a hot button issue, it’s interesting to note that more than half of the team was born outside the U.S. or have parents who are immigrants.

This year’s team also has a particularly German influence. John Brooks, Timmy Chandler, Julian Green, Jermaine Jones, Fabian Johnson — all were either born in Germany or have a German parent.

There are also four players who are Latino and two players who are Native American. Chris Wondolowski of the Kiowa tribe and and SBNation.com identified DeAndre Yedlin as black, Native American and Latvian.

Read the full story here: http://soccer.fusion.net/2014/06/16/without-immigration-half-of-the-u-s-world-cup-soccer-team-disappears/

Tough love from Shonda Rhimes to the Dartmouth Class of 2014. In her commencement speech, she addresses the myth of “having it all” but also the great rewards of being a successful woman who is also a devoted mother…

Shonda, how do you do it all?
The answer is this: I don’t.
Whenever you see me somewhere succeeding in one area of my life, that almost certainly means I am failing in another area of my life.
If I am killing it on a Scandal script for work, I am probably missing bath and story time at home. If I am at home sewing my kids’ Halloween costumes, I’m probably blowing off a rewrite I was supposed to turn in. If I am accepting a prestigious award, I am missing my baby’s first swim lesson. If I am at my daughter’s debut in her school musical, I am missing Sandra Oh’s last scene ever being filmed at Grey’s Anatomy. If I am succeeding at one, I am inevitably failing at the other. That is the tradeoff. That is the Faustian bargain one makes with the devil that comes with being a powerful working woman who is also a powerful mother. You never feel a hundred percent OK; you never get your sea legs; you are always a little nauseous. Something is always lost.
Something is always missing.
And yet. I want my daughters to see me and know me as a woman who works. I want that example set for them. I like how proud they are when they come to my offices and know that they come to Shondaland. There is a land and it is named after their mother. In their world, mothers run companies. In their world, mothers own Thursday nights. In their world, mothers work. And I am a better mother for it. The woman I am because I get to run Shondaland, because I get to write all day, because I get to spend my days making things up, that woman is a better person—and a better mother. Because that woman is happy. That woman is fulfilled. That woman is whole. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who didn’t get to do this all day long. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who wasn’t doing.

Watch her full speech and read the transcript here.

Tough love from Shonda Rhimes to the Dartmouth Class of 2014. In her commencement speech, she addresses the myth of “having it all” but also the great rewards of being a successful woman who is also a devoted mother…

Shonda, how do you do it all?

The answer is this: I don’t.

Whenever you see me somewhere succeeding in one area of my life, that almost certainly means I am failing in another area of my life.

If I am killing it on a Scandal script for work, I am probably missing bath and story time at home. If I am at home sewing my kids’ Halloween costumes, I’m probably blowing off a rewrite I was supposed to turn in. If I am accepting a prestigious award, I am missing my baby’s first swim lesson. If I am at my daughter’s debut in her school musical, I am missing Sandra Oh’s last scene ever being filmed at Grey’s Anatomy. If I am succeeding at one, I am inevitably failing at the other. That is the tradeoff. That is the Faustian bargain one makes with the devil that comes with being a powerful working woman who is also a powerful mother. You never feel a hundred percent OK; you never get your sea legs; you are always a little nauseous. Something is always lost.

Something is always missing.

And yet. I want my daughters to see me and know me as a woman who works. I want that example set for them. I like how proud they are when they come to my offices and know that they come to Shondaland. There is a land and it is named after their mother. In their world, mothers run companies. In their world, mothers own Thursday nights. In their world, mothers work. And I am a better mother for it. The woman I am because I get to run Shondaland, because I get to write all day, because I get to spend my days making things up, that woman is a better person—and a better mother. Because that woman is happy. That woman is fulfilled. That woman is whole. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who didn’t get to do this all day long. I wouldn’t want them to know the me who wasn’t doing.

Watch her full speech and read the transcript here.

Elle’s Pharrell cover phail
“I respect and honor every kind of race, background and culture,” Pharrell says. “I am genuinely sorry.” [Buzzfeed]

Taino Ray: How can you do something so stupid and disrespectfulll.. you are not a Chief Pharrel.. The eagle feathers are sacred… Even if you are part Native the headdress is off limits… Its for Warriors and people of the plains culture.. You don’t have the right to wear that Pharrel… neither does Cher or Emerson Windy… You guys don’t get it…. You will learn the hard way by us Natives telling you so… [Indian Country]

Elle’s Pharrell cover phail

“I respect and honor every kind of race, background and culture,” Pharrell says. “I am genuinely sorry.” [Buzzfeed]

Taino Ray: How can you do something so stupid and disrespectfulll.. you are not a Chief Pharrel.. The eagle feathers are sacred… Even if you are part Native the headdress is off limits… Its for Warriors and people of the plains culture.. You don’t have the right to wear that Pharrel… neither does Cher or Emerson Windy… You guys don’t get it…. You will learn the hard way by us Natives telling you so… [Indian Country]

flonyc
The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…
flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.
This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.
As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.

The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…

flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.

This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.

As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.