Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…
In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:
“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”
“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.”
Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…

In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:

“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”

“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.

Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

retronewyork
Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.
Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”
But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 
retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964
photo by Garry Winogrand

Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.

Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”

But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 

retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964

photo by Garry Winogrand

What’s the social value of making fun of people?

In their new Time magazine cover article, "The Case for Mockery," Key and Peele argue that political correctness has overrun American culture, and that mocking people — even the most vulnerable or maligned members of society — helps pull them in from the sidelines, and into “the greater human conversation.” 

"When a humorist makes the conscious decision to exclude a group from derision, isn’t he or she implying that the members of that group are not capable of self-reflection? Or don’t possess the mental faculties to recognize the nuances of satire? A group that’s excluded never gets the opportunity to join in the greater human conversation.

"Luckily, a lot of people get this–at least when it comes to their own cultures. Like the burn victim in our sketch, they plead, ‘You skipped me! Do me!’"


"I’m a fucking Indian woman who has her own fucking network show," exclaimed an exasperated Mindy Kaling at the SXSW conference in Austin, Texas, when asked by a member of the 2,000-person crowd why there aren’t more women of color on “The Mindy Project.”
"No one asks any of these other shows that I adore — and I won’t name them because they’re my friends — why no leads on their show are women or women of color, but I’m the one who gets all of these things.
“It is a little insulting. I don’t run the country, I’m not a political figure, I’m someone writing a show and I want to use funny people.” [HuffPo]

Photo: Beth Dubber/Fox

"I’m a fucking Indian woman who has her own fucking network show," exclaimed an exasperated Mindy Kaling at the SXSW conference in Austin, Texas, when asked by a member of the 2,000-person crowd why there aren’t more women of color on “The Mindy Project.”

"No one asks any of these other shows that I adore — and I won’t name them because they’re my friends — why no leads on their show are women or women of color, but I’m the one who gets all of these things.

“It is a little insulting. I don’t run the country, I’m not a political figure, I’m someone writing a show and I want to use funny people.” [HuffPo]

Photo: Beth Dubber/Fox