• The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data.
  • The United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.
  • The black-white income gap is roughly 40 percent greater today than it was in 1967.

Read the rest: "When Whites Just Don’t Get It" by Nicholas Kristof

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 
But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.
“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”
He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 

But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.

“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”

He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

In the last year or two, I’ve regularly heard people despair about the state of the world, how “there’s just so much bad news.” I’ve been hearing that a lot more lately, with Gaza, ISIS and Ferguson. People really sound overwhelmed. But I can’t help but wonder, is the news that much worse today than it was five years ago, or fifteen years ago? Or is this really a matter of the way we consume news — drown in the news — via Twitter, Facebook, TV and all the rest? It seems to me that for all the possibilities of social media, the way it connects us intimately to people around the world, it also leaves us with a chronic sense of helplessness.

In the last year or two, I’ve regularly heard people despair about the state of the world, how “there’s just so much bad news.” I’ve been hearing that a lot more lately, with Gaza, ISIS and Ferguson. People really sound overwhelmed. But I can’t help but wonder, is the news that much worse today than it was five years ago, or fifteen years ago? Or is this really a matter of the way we consume news — drown in the news — via Twitter, Facebook, TV and all the rest? It seems to me that for all the possibilities of social media, the way it connects us intimately to people around the world, it also leaves us with a chronic sense of helplessness.