livelymorgue

livelymorgue:

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

In the wake of the Donald Sterling incident in the NBA, fifty members of the U.S. Senate have signed a letter, urging the Washington Redskins to change their name and mascot:

“The N.F.L. can no longer ignore this and perpetuate the use of this name as anything but what it is: a racial slur,” said the letter, which was circulated by Senator Maria Cantwell, Democrat of Washington, and endorsed by Senator Harry Reid, Democrat of Nevada, the majority leader. “We urge the N.F.L. to formally support a name change for the Washington football team.”
Cantwell said that “we are going to find out if the N.F.L. can act against this kind of discrimination as quickly as the N.B.A. did.” She said she considered the Senate letter an important milestone. [NYT]

In the wake of the Donald Sterling incident in the NBA, fifty members of the U.S. Senate have signed a letter, urging the Washington Redskins to change their name and mascot:

“The N.F.L. can no longer ignore this and perpetuate the use of this name as anything but what it is: a racial slur,” said the letter, which was circulated by Senator Maria Cantwell, Democrat of Washington, and endorsed by Senator Harry Reid, Democrat of Nevada, the majority leader. “We urge the N.F.L. to formally support a name change for the Washington football team.”

Cantwell said that “we are going to find out if the N.F.L. can act against this kind of discrimination as quickly as the N.B.A. did.” She said she considered the Senate letter an important milestone. [NYT]

anthonybourdain

"Some, of course, like to claim that Mexicans are “stealing American jobs”. But in two decades as a chef and employer, I never had ONE American kid walk in my door and apply for a dishwashing job, a porter’s position—or even a job as prep cook. Mexicans do much of the work in this country that Americans, provably, simply won’t do."

anthonybourdain:

image

Americans love Mexican food. We consume nachos, tacos, burritos, tortas, enchiladas, tamales and anything resembling Mexican in enormous quantities. We love Mexican beverages, happily knocking back huge amounts of tequila, mezcal and Mexican beer every year. We love Mexican people—as we sure…

The worldwide market for skin lighteners is expected to hit $20 billion in 2018.
Lighteners were developed in the U.S. during Reconstruction, by former slaves who wanted to get better jobs. Even as late as the mid-20th century, civil rights leaders like Walter White of the NAACP thought lighteners would end racial discrimination because black people could suddenly look white. Instead, the products moved into sub-Saharan Africa as well as East and South Asia and lightening became a way of life.
On a recent morning, I found Dilshad Jiwani at an Indian supermarket in Queens. She was buying a bottle of Fair and Lovely, the world’s #1 brand of skin lightener, according to the company, used by one in 10 women globally.
"People look at you differently if your skin color is different. Especially in America, because they’re fair and we have dark skin, so we’re treated badly. So I want to look fair too."
Jiwani said that in the past, people in the subway would get up and move away from her because she was darker. “It feels like insult!” she said. “They did that to me, and I felt bad. Now, since I’m white, they don’t do that.”
Listen to the full Micropolis segment on skin lightening across cultures, and how dark women like Lupita Nyong’o are tackling the problem of colorism.
Skintone-Pantone chart by Angelica Dass.

The worldwide market for skin lighteners is expected to hit $20 billion in 2018.

Lighteners were developed in the U.S. during Reconstruction, by former slaves who wanted to get better jobs. Even as late as the mid-20th century, civil rights leaders like Walter White of the NAACP thought lighteners would end racial discrimination because black people could suddenly look white. Instead, the products moved into sub-Saharan Africa as well as East and South Asia and lightening became a way of life.

On a recent morning, I found Dilshad Jiwani at an Indian supermarket in Queens. She was buying a bottle of Fair and Lovely, the world’s #1 brand of skin lightener, according to the company, used by one in 10 women globally.

"People look at you differently if your skin color is different. Especially in America, because they’re fair and we have dark skin, so we’re treated badly. So I want to look fair too."

Jiwani said that in the past, people in the subway would get up and move away from her because she was darker. “It feels like insult!” she said. “They did that to me, and I felt bad. Now, since I’m white, they don’t do that.”

Listen to the full Micropolis segment on skin lightening across cultures, and how dark women like Lupita Nyong’o are tackling the problem of colorism.

Skintone-Pantone chart by Angelica Dass.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…
In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:
“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”
“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.”
Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…

In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:

“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”

“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.

Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

retronewyork
Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.
Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”
But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 
retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964
photo by Garry Winogrand

Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.

Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”

But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 

retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964

photo by Garry Winogrand