American Apparel with a timeless brand of advertising: Get a model, take her top off, then cloak the sex factor with a narrative of self-empowerment and boundary-breaking (she left Islam). “Maks is not content to fit her life into anyone else’s conventional narrative. That’s what makes her essential to the mosaic that is Los Angeles…”
The ad tries to make the case that American Apparel is better because it pays higher wages than sweatshops in Bangladesh. Instead, it’s annoying a lot of feminists, including labor activist Chaumtoli Huq, originally from Bangladesh, who wrote in a Facebook discussion that its essential promise is “come to America, lose faith, distance yourself from your culture, get topless and you will get fair wages. Seems like a lopsided bargain.” 
Whereas Laboni, a Brooklyn-based social justice lawyer (also from Bangladesh, had this to say: “Honestly, i think our/my culture can stand to be more sex-positive. but i’m deeply offended by the ad’s wordplay, which so clearly reveals how much American Apparel values sexual provocation over a very real issue.”

American Apparel with a timeless brand of advertising: Get a model, take her top off, then cloak the sex factor with a narrative of self-empowerment and boundary-breaking (she left Islam). “Maks is not content to fit her life into anyone else’s conventional narrative. That’s what makes her essential to the mosaic that is Los Angeles…”

The ad tries to make the case that American Apparel is better because it pays higher wages than sweatshops in Bangladesh. Instead, it’s annoying a lot of feminists, including labor activist Chaumtoli Huq, originally from Bangladesh, who wrote in a Facebook discussion that its essential promise is “come to America, lose faith, distance yourself from your culture, get topless and you will get fair wages. Seems like a lopsided bargain.” 

Whereas Laboni, a Brooklyn-based social justice lawyer (also from Bangladesh, had this to say: “Honestly, i think our/my culture can stand to be more sex-positive. but i’m deeply offended by the ad’s wordplay, which so clearly reveals how much American Apparel values sexual provocation over a very real issue.”

viagrastrong

This is a performance piece that’s generating a lot of heat and outrage but no real answers. I’m genuinely confused — what exactly is the artist’s objective? Based on some of the angry Tumblr comments I’m seeing, maybe it’s to show that women who dress a certain way are objectified. Or is it that BLACK women become spectacles when they enter rarefied environments like the Museum of Modern Art? Or is it just black women who dress provocatively? In which case I wonder how she’d be perceived in another space: would people in, say, the Bronx ignore her, or would they also take pictures? Unfortunately there’s no way for us to know, or for that matter, to see whether people are just as likely to take pictures of a MAN dressed like that. Or is the ultimate message just, “People, ask for permission before you take someone’s picture?” Good art often provokes a lot of questions but I don’t really feel provoked as much as manipulated, and annoyed.

viagrastrong:

ken-yadigit:

blackjatovia:

This video is revelatory. 

This was actually really interesting.

so like… I want to know the point behind this? what was trying to be proven and what did she expect to happen? I’m not tryna come off but like… what happened wasn’t surprising. at all.

upworthy
19% of prime time television characters are non-human while only 17% are women

A Profile of Americans’ Media Use and Political Socialization Effects: television and the Internet’s relationship to social connectedness in the USA ― Daniel German & Caitlin Lally

There are more “non-humans” on TV than women. Talk about unequal gender representation in the media.

(via yourlittle-bird)

historicaltimes
Evelyn McHale in death, aka “The Most Beautiful Suicide” after leaping from the Empire State Building in 1947. The 24 year old left behind a note, saying her fiance Barry Rhodes would be better off without her. 
“I don’t think I would make a good wife for anyone…. Tell my father, I have too many of my mother’s tendencies.”
She wore her pearls and white gloves.
More here.
historicaltimes:

Evelyn McHale’s suicide. She jumped off the Empire State Building crushing a limousine below. 1947.

Evelyn McHale in death, aka “The Most Beautiful Suicide” after leaping from the Empire State Building in 1947. The 24 year old left behind a note, saying her fiance Barry Rhodes would be better off without her. 

“I don’t think I would make a good wife for anyone…. Tell my father, I have too many of my mother’s tendencies.”

She wore her pearls and white gloves.

More here.

historicaltimes:

Evelyn McHale’s suicide. She jumped off the Empire State Building crushing a limousine below. 1947.

racialicious

Fascinating. These girls started performing for American soldiers in 1954 for chocolate and beer which they then exchanged for food. And since they didn’t know any English, they had to phonetically memorize every song ahead of time — country hits like “Ole Buttermilk Sky.” THE ROOTS OF K-POP.

neatorino:

The Kim Sisters

(from the website above) 

[The Kim Sisters] were a South Korean trio who had a successful career in America during the 50’s and 60’s. To support their family during the Korean War, they performed songs for American GIs who then spread word of them after returning home. They were signed to a contract and went to the US, eventually performing 22 times on The Ed Sullivan Show.
Can I just add how much I love that they were successful Asian-Americans in the mid-20th century? Also I’m glad vintage style inspiration isn’t spared for Asian women!
A few days before winning an Oscar, Lupita Nyong’o spoke at the Black Women in Hollywood luncheon, where she delivered these powerful remarks about skin color:
"I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty. Black beauty. Dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: ‘Dear Lupita, it reads, ‘I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.’"
Lupita herself went through a period of intense self-hate, because of her dark skin. Read the rest of her remarks here.

A few days before winning an Oscar, Lupita Nyong’o spoke at the Black Women in Hollywood luncheon, where she delivered these powerful remarks about skin color:

"I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty. Black beauty. Dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: ‘Dear Lupita, it reads, ‘I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.’"

Lupita herself went through a period of intense self-hate, because of her dark skin. Read the rest of her remarks here.

As a kid, whenever my family visited India I’d hear how great Pears soap was, and I could never figure out why. It just had an aura. Now I know — check out the wretched native in the corner, getting Pears soap like it’s a communion wafer. [via] 
btw, I’m looking for old TV commercials of skin-lightening products — know of any? 

As a kid, whenever my family visited India I’d hear how great Pears soap was, and I could never figure out why. It just had an aura. Now I know — check out the wretched native in the corner, getting Pears soap like it’s a communion wafer. [via

btw, I’m looking for old TV commercials of skin-lightening products — know of any?