turningpointsinwomenshistory
Love this shot. She’s like “Let’s pick up the pace, boys. I’ve got a power lunch, then a speech at the Rotary Club, and you know I can’t miss my three o clock nap.”
turningpointsinwomenshistory:

Birthday wishes are in order for Ruby Bridges. She was the first African American child to attend an all white school in the South. Parents of the other students pulled their kids from school and teachers refused to instruct while Ruby attended. At the age of six, Bridges bravely faced mobs of angry protesters who shouted insults and threatened her life. Her example demonstrates that anyone, of any age is capable of showing great courage and inspiring great change. Thanks to Ms. Magazine for the info

Love this shot. She’s like “Let’s pick up the pace, boys. I’ve got a power lunch, then a speech at the Rotary Club, and you know I can’t miss my three o clock nap.”

turningpointsinwomenshistory:

Birthday wishes are in order for Ruby Bridges. She was the first African American child to attend an all white school in the South. Parents of the other students pulled their kids from school and teachers refused to instruct while Ruby attended. At the age of six, Bridges bravely faced mobs of angry protesters who shouted insults and threatened her life. Her example demonstrates that anyone, of any age is capable of showing great courage and inspiring great change. Thanks to Ms. Magazine for the info

  • The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data.
  • The United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.
  • The black-white income gap is roughly 40 percent greater today than it was in 1967.

Read the rest: "When Whites Just Don’t Get It" by Nicholas Kristof

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 
But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.
“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”
He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 

But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.

“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”

He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

A few days before winning an Oscar, Lupita Nyong’o spoke at the Black Women in Hollywood luncheon, where she delivered these powerful remarks about skin color:
"I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty. Black beauty. Dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: ‘Dear Lupita, it reads, ‘I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.’"
Lupita herself went through a period of intense self-hate, because of her dark skin. Read the rest of her remarks here.

A few days before winning an Oscar, Lupita Nyong’o spoke at the Black Women in Hollywood luncheon, where she delivered these powerful remarks about skin color:

"I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty. Black beauty. Dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: ‘Dear Lupita, it reads, ‘I think you’re really lucky to be this Black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.’"

Lupita herself went through a period of intense self-hate, because of her dark skin. Read the rest of her remarks here.

That’s African pop star Dencia on the left… and on the right. 
Her new skin-lightening cream, WHITENICIOUS, is apparently making some SERIOUS CA$H. 
In her interview this week with Ebony, she says 80% of her customers are African-American, not African. And strangely, 10% of her customers are white. 
On the name:

You know, I was coming up with all these glamorous things and my best friend was like “Nah, ‘Whitenicious’ is good.” And when she gave me the name, I was looking up definitions of white. Ok let me define how I see white. (reads) “The color white affects the mind and the body by aiding in mental clarity, promoting feelings of fresh beginnings and renewal assisting in cleansing, clearing obstacles and clutter and encouraging purification.” And guess what? Dark spots is obstacles. Hyperpigmenation is obstacles. 

Dencia also insists (wrongly) there’s no medical research on the link between skin whitening and cancer.
Read the rest of Ebony’s interview with Dencia.

That’s African pop star Dencia on the left… and on the right. 

Her new skin-lightening cream, WHITENICIOUS, is apparently making some SERIOUS CA$H. 

In her interview this week with Ebony, she says 80% of her customers are African-American, not African. And strangely, 10% of her customers are white. 

On the name:

You know, I was coming up with all these glamorous things and my best friend was like “Nah, ‘Whitenicious’ is good.” And when she gave me the name, I was looking up definitions of white. Ok let me define how I see white. (reads) “The color white affects the mind and the body by aiding in mental clarity, promoting feelings of fresh beginnings and renewal assisting in cleansing, clearing obstacles and clutter and encouraging purification.” And guess what? Dark spots is obstacles. Hyperpigmenation is obstacles. 

Dencia also insists (wrongly) there’s no medical research on the link between skin whitening and cancer.

Read the rest of Ebony’s interview with Dencia.

Maybe by now you’ve read this truly trashy yoga essay at XOJane, by a “skinny white girl” who’s suddenly overcome by racial guilt when a “fairly heavy black woman” enters her class. If not, here’s a taste:

"I thought about how that must feel: to be a heavyset black woman entering for the first time a system that by all accounts seems unable to accommodate her body. What could I do to help her? If I were her, I thought, I would want as little attention to be drawn to my despair as possible—I would not want anyone to look at me or notice me. And so I tried to very deliberately avoid looking in her direction each time I was in downward dog, but I could feel her hostility just the same."

For reasons that are completely unclear — I’m guessing it’s either intellectual laziness or fear of black yoginis — the author, Jen Caron, fails to approach the woman and actually ask her if she feels out of place. Instead, Caron runs home and collapses in tears… before realizing she could cash in on her own suffering and get a byline in the process. 
Apparently XOJane read some of the thousands of WTF responses to the essay. So they posted another piece today, by an actual black woman, Pia Glenn:

"Your experience, if we can possibly set aside the (non-)fan fiction of the imagined mindset of the woman behind you, starts a dialogue; sure. But not every conversation needs to be entertained without you doing some homework on your own first. I am taking the time to write this because as a black woman who shares this space, I won’t stand idly by and watch you use it as a platform to climb to the mountaintop of alleged racial progress by stepping on the humanity of another black woman."

Photo: Blonde Girls Doing Yoga Poses -7936 by Edson Hong on Flickr.

Maybe by now you’ve read this truly trashy yoga essay at XOJane, by a “skinny white girl” who’s suddenly overcome by racial guilt when a “fairly heavy black woman” enters her class. If not, here’s a taste:

"I thought about how that must feel: to be a heavyset black woman entering for the first time a system that by all accounts seems unable to accommodate her body. What could I do to help her? If I were her, I thought, I would want as little attention to be drawn to my despair as possible—I would not want anyone to look at me or notice me. And so I tried to very deliberately avoid looking in her direction each time I was in downward dog, but I could feel her hostility just the same."

For reasons that are completely unclear — I’m guessing it’s either intellectual laziness or fear of black yoginis — the author, Jen Caron, fails to approach the woman and actually ask her if she feels out of place. Instead, Caron runs home and collapses in tears… before realizing she could cash in on her own suffering and get a byline in the process. 

Apparently XOJane read some of the thousands of WTF responses to the essay. So they posted another piece today, by an actual black woman, Pia Glenn:

"Your experience, if we can possibly set aside the (non-)fan fiction of the imagined mindset of the woman behind you, starts a dialogue; sure. But not every conversation needs to be entertained without you doing some homework on your own first. I am taking the time to write this because as a black woman who shares this space, I won’t stand idly by and watch you use it as a platform to climb to the mountaintop of alleged racial progress by stepping on the humanity of another black woman."

Photo: Blonde Girls Doing Yoga Poses -7936 by Edson Hong on Flickr.

historicaltimes
By now the story of Bushwick’s transformation from ‘hood to hipster haven has been told more than enough times. But what caused it to go up in flames in the first place? 
A City Journal article, “The Death and Life of Bushwick,” explains that it was a combination of race relations and bad policy.
The problems began in the mid-1960s, when race riots were hitting urban centers across America, and white residents were getting jittery. Homeowners would find messages in their mailbox — “Don’t wait until it’s too late!” — a reference not just to possible violence but to the imminent arrival of minorities moving up north. Sure enough…

…speculators bought homes from Bushwick residents for an average of $8,000 apiece, and then, using fraudulent appraisals and a Great Society federal mortgage program that insured home loans to low-income buyers, sold them to poor blacks and Puerto Ricans at prices that they couldn’t afford— on average, about $20,000 per home.

Many of those new homeowners defaulted, abandoning their homes and prompting property values to further plummet. By the early 70s, hundreds of buildings in the neighborhood were empty, and owners started setting fire to their own empty buildings in order to collect on fire insurance.

Gangs set fire to abandoned buildings, too, and then waited for the fire department to do the hard work of knocking down walls and floors, making valuable fixtures and copper wiring easier to steal. By the early seventies, infernos blazed nightly. The neighborhood’s wooden row houses, tightly packed together and often sharing attics, proved particularly vulnerable; a fire would erupt in one building and swiftly spread, sometimes consuming half a block.

Higher crime followed. In 1990, there were 77 murders in the 83rd precinct. Last year, there were just 7.
historicaltimes:

Bushwick, Brooklyn 1980

By now the story of Bushwick’s transformation from ‘hood to hipster haven has been told more than enough times. But what caused it to go up in flames in the first place? 

A City Journal article, “The Death and Life of Bushwick,” explains that it was a combination of race relations and bad policy.

The problems began in the mid-1960s, when race riots were hitting urban centers across America, and white residents were getting jittery. Homeowners would find messages in their mailbox — “Don’t wait until it’s too late!” — a reference not just to possible violence but to the imminent arrival of minorities moving up north. Sure enough…

…speculators bought homes from Bushwick residents for an average of $8,000 apiece, and then, using fraudulent appraisals and a Great Society federal mortgage program that insured home loans to low-income buyers, sold them to poor blacks and Puerto Ricans at prices that they couldn’t afford— on average, about $20,000 per home.

Many of those new homeowners defaulted, abandoning their homes and prompting property values to further plummet. By the early 70s, hundreds of buildings in the neighborhood were empty, and owners started setting fire to their own empty buildings in order to collect on fire insurance.

Gangs set fire to abandoned buildings, too, and then waited for the fire department to do the hard work of knocking down walls and floors, making valuable fixtures and copper wiring easier to steal. By the early seventies, infernos blazed nightly. The neighborhood’s wooden row houses, tightly packed together and often sharing attics, proved particularly vulnerable; a fire would erupt in one building and swiftly spread, sometimes consuming half a block.

Higher crime followed. In 1990, there were 77 murders in the 83rd precinct. Last year, there were just 7.

historicaltimes:

Bushwick, Brooklyn 1980

gabrielrobertflores
Will tech help lift New York City’s black and Hispanic communities? It’s certainly looking that way. 

Since 2010, the number of blacks working in computer and mathematical occupations — the Census Bureau’s term for tech-related jobs — in the city has risen by 19.7 percent, based on a preliminary analysis of new census data. Over the same stretch, the number of Hispanics in such occupations in New York City has risen by 25.4 percent. By comparison, non-Hispanic whites in computer and mathematical occupations experienced just a 6.4 percent gain since 2010. [NYT]

gabrielrobertflores:

Lower Manhattan, 4.5.2013

Will tech help lift New York City’s black and Hispanic communities? It’s certainly looking that way. 

Since 2010, the number of blacks working in computer and mathematical occupations — the Census Bureau’s term for tech-related jobs — in the city has risen by 19.7 percent, based on a preliminary analysis of new census data. Over the same stretch, the number of Hispanics in such occupations in New York City has risen by 25.4 percent. By comparison, non-Hispanic whites in computer and mathematical occupations experienced just a 6.4 percent gain since 2010. [NYT]

gabrielrobertflores:

Lower Manhattan, 4.5.2013

Questlove just responded at length to the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
But in his new book, “Mo Meta Blues,” the musician gives us a window into what it’s like to drive while black, no matter how accomplished one is.
On the very first day he drives his new car around — a Scion, the first car he’d ever owned — he was stopped by the police not once, not twice, but three times. Here’s what went down when the third cop stopped him, and recognized him.
p. 258.
"Tell me something," I said. "What’s the matter? Why am I a magnet for you guys tonight?"
"Oh," he said. "That’s easy. We’re in the Temple University neighborhood."
"Right," I said.
"And you’re in this car."
"And me in this car what?" I loved my Scion. It was part of my identity. I thought anything more lavish was the kind of thing a drug dealer would drive. This was the car of a thoughtful artist, a man who didn’t live through his material possessions.
"It’s the wrong car for you," he said. "It just doesn’t look right. If you were driving an SUV, you’d look like a professional football player. But this little thing sets off alarms. It looks like you took it from a college student."
Image from Flickr/Naoharu

Questlove just responded at length to the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

But in his new book, “Mo Meta Blues,” the musician gives us a window into what it’s like to drive while black, no matter how accomplished one is.

On the very first day he drives his new car around — a Scion, the first car he’d ever owned — he was stopped by the police not once, not twice, but three times. Here’s what went down when the third cop stopped him, and recognized him.

p. 258.

"Tell me something," I said. "What’s the matter? Why am I a magnet for you guys tonight?"

"Oh," he said. "That’s easy. We’re in the Temple University neighborhood."

"Right," I said.

"And you’re in this car."

"And me in this car what?" I loved my Scion. It was part of my identity. I thought anything more lavish was the kind of thing a drug dealer would drive. This was the car of a thoughtful artist, a man who didn’t live through his material possessions.

"It’s the wrong car for you," he said. "It just doesn’t look right. If you were driving an SUV, you’d look like a professional football player. But this little thing sets off alarms. It looks like you took it from a college student."

Image from Flickr/Naoharu

In the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death and the acquittal of George Zimmerman, we ask: Is it possible for black men to avoid being profiled?
Tony Award-winning choreographer and MacArthur Genius Bill T Jones says he makes it a point to be extra-polite to the police, something he learned from watching his father while growing up in the South. 
In the mid-90s, Jones was pulled out of his car by a police officer and accused of being an armed robber. It was only when he and his partner produced a recent issue of Time magazine that the cop relented: there was Jones, on the cover. The headline was “Black Renaissance: African-American artists are truly free at last.”
Still, when Jones was about to leave, he turned to the police officer and, remembering what he’d been taught by his parents, thanked him. 
"It felt like it was almost in our DNA, as black Americans," said Jones. "You have to be careful, because they are looking for a reason to shoot you."
Listen to what other black men have to say on the matter, and why the very notion of modifying one’s behavior or clothing is reprehensible to others: "Trayvon Martin and the Threat of Black Manhood"

In the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death and the acquittal of George Zimmerman, we ask: Is it possible for black men to avoid being profiled?

Tony Award-winning choreographer and MacArthur Genius Bill T Jones says he makes it a point to be extra-polite to the police, something he learned from watching his father while growing up in the South. 

In the mid-90s, Jones was pulled out of his car by a police officer and accused of being an armed robber. It was only when he and his partner produced a recent issue of Time magazine that the cop relented: there was Jones, on the cover. The headline was “Black Renaissance: African-American artists are truly free at last.”

Still, when Jones was about to leave, he turned to the police officer and, remembering what he’d been taught by his parents, thanked him. 

"It felt like it was almost in our DNA, as black Americans," said Jones. "You have to be careful, because they are looking for a reason to shoot you."

Listen to what other black men have to say on the matter, and why the very notion of modifying one’s behavior or clothing is reprehensible to others: "Trayvon Martin and the Threat of Black Manhood"

There’s a growing black surf scene in the Rockaways. Guys like Louis Harris, above, or Brian James, aka “the Nautical Negro.” 
When James started surfing here in 1997, he said it was tough.
“Lot of racial epithets hurled out in water. Lot of arguing. But me personally, I let them know I wasn’t going for it. They got a problem, we can settle it on the beach.”
But now, it’s other black people who insist that “black people don’t surf.” 
Check out Stephen Nessen’s story at WNYC.

There’s a growing black surf scene in the Rockaways. Guys like Louis Harris, above, or Brian James, aka “the Nautical Negro.” 

When James started surfing here in 1997, he said it was tough.

“Lot of racial epithets hurled out in water. Lot of arguing. But me personally, I let them know I wasn’t going for it. They got a problem, we can settle it on the beach.”

But now, it’s other black people who insist that “black people don’t surf.” 

Check out Stephen Nessen’s story at WNYC.

"There are more black men in jail than in college."
True or false?
For years, it’s been an article of faith that an African-American man was more likely to end up in prison than in an institute of higher education.
Even President Obama, in his first campaign, said, “We have more work to do when more young black men languish in prison than attend colleges and universities across America.”
Charles Barkley said the same thing to Bob Costas.
But the statement is wildly off the mark. An urban legend.
"Today there are approximately 600,000 more black men in college than in jail, and the best research evidence suggests that the line was never true to begin with," wrote Ivory A. Toldson, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education, in an article for The Root, last week.
The original myth, which he called “arguably the most frequently quoted statistic about black men in the United States,” was created by the Justice Policy Institute in a report called “Cellblocks or Classrooms.” It came out in 2002.
Toldson wrote that today, “black male representation in higher education is proportional to black male representation in the adult population.” The problem is that most of those students are under-represented at competitive colleges and over-represented at community colleges and online institutions.
In New York, where the overall prison population has dramatically come down — along with crime levels — Toldson told me the numbers reflected the changing scenario across the nation.
"In 2009, the total (all race) male prison population in New York state was 57,177. (DOJ) In 2010, the number of Black male college students in New York state was 90,558. (American Community Survey, U.S. Census)"
-Photo from the Gates Foundation via Flickr

"There are more black men in jail than in college."

True or false?

For years, it’s been an article of faith that an African-American man was more likely to end up in prison than in an institute of higher education.

Even President Obama, in his first campaign, said, “We have more work to do when more young black men languish in prison than attend colleges and universities across America.”

Charles Barkley said the same thing to Bob Costas.

But the statement is wildly off the mark. An urban legend.

"Today there are approximately 600,000 more black men in college than in jail, and the best research evidence suggests that the line was never true to begin with," wrote Ivory A. Toldson, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Negro Education, in an article for The Root, last week.

The original myth, which he called “arguably the most frequently quoted statistic about black men in the United States,” was created by the Justice Policy Institute in a report called “Cellblocks or Classrooms.” It came out in 2002.

Toldson wrote that today, “black male representation in higher education is proportional to black male representation in the adult population.” The problem is that most of those students are under-represented at competitive colleges and over-represented at community colleges and online institutions.

In New York, where the overall prison population has dramatically come down — along with crime levels — Toldson told me the numbers reflected the changing scenario across the nation.

"In 2009, the total (all race) male prison population in New York state was 57,177. (DOJ) In 2010, the number of Black male college students in New York state was 90,558. (American Community Survey, U.S. Census)"

-Photo from the Gates Foundation via Flickr