Are New Yorkers getting richer or poorer? 
It’s not quite as straightforward as you might think. Household incomes in relatively affluent neighborhoods like the Upper West Side and Gramercy have gone down by 12 percent. While those in Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Central Harlem have risen by 6 percent. 
The biggest declines weren’t in the Bronx but in Brooklyn: both Bensonhurst and the ultra-Orthodox area of Borough Park saw their median household incomes drop by 15 percent. 
Click on the map above.

Are New Yorkers getting richer or poorer? 

It’s not quite as straightforward as you might think. Household incomes in relatively affluent neighborhoods like the Upper West Side and Gramercy have gone down by 12 percent. While those in Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Central Harlem have risen by 6 percent. 

The biggest declines weren’t in the Bronx but in Brooklyn: both Bensonhurst and the ultra-Orthodox area of Borough Park saw their median household incomes drop by 15 percent. 

Click on the map above.

How much $$$ do your fellow subway commuters make? 
The New Yorker, in all its statistical brilliance, has tried to answer that question with this interactive infographic, "Inequality and New York’s Subway." (the purple  labels and dollar figures are mine)
It uses census data associated with the tract in which each subway stop is located. 
In the graphic above, I’ve focused on the L line, which runs from Chelsea to Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway with multiple stops in hipsterdom. 
While L line commuters who live near the 14th St/Union Square stop have a median household income of $109,637, those who get off at at Bedford Ave. in Williamsburg have a median household income of $57,969 while those just 4 stops further, at Montrose Ave., earn less than half as much, at $23,865. 
Citywide, the highest household income was $205,192, at the Chambers St and Park Place stops of the 2 and 3 lines and the WTC stop of the E line — they’re all in the same census tract.
A number of subway stops have median household incomes below $20k, but Sutter Ave. on the L line has the distinction of being the poorest subway stop, at $12,288.

How much $$$ do your fellow subway commuters make? 

The New Yorker, in all its statistical brilliance, has tried to answer that question with this interactive infographic, "Inequality and New York’s Subway." (the purple  labels and dollar figures are mine)

It uses census data associated with the tract in which each subway stop is located. 

In the graphic above, I’ve focused on the L line, which runs from Chelsea to Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway with multiple stops in hipsterdom. 

While L line commuters who live near the 14th St/Union Square stop have a median household income of $109,637, those who get off at at Bedford Ave. in Williamsburg have a median household income of $57,969 while those just 4 stops further, at Montrose Ave., earn less than half as much, at $23,865. 

Citywide, the highest household income was $205,192, at the Chambers St and Park Place stops of the 2 and 3 lines and the WTC stop of the E line — they’re all in the same census tract.

A number of subway stops have median household incomes below $20k, but Sutter Ave. on the L line has the distinction of being the poorest subway stop, at $12,288.

Once it was burning, but now the Bronx is back. Big news in the demographic world:
"For the first time in decades, people are no longer abandoning the Bronx.
Not only did the borough’s population rise, but more people moved there in the year ended July 1, 2012, than left, according to the estimates. While the net gain in migration was only 115, it contrasts starkly with annual losses that were regularly in the thousands and neared 20,000 two decades ago.”
Another thing that caught my eye: “Over all, New York City’s population was estimated by the census last July at 8,336,697, a surge of 161,564 since 2010 — nearly as many as the city gained in the entire preceding decade.”

Once it was burning, but now the Bronx is back. Big news in the demographic world:

"For the first time in decades, people are no longer abandoning the Bronx.

Not only did the borough’s population rise, but more people moved there in the year ended July 1, 2012, than left, according to the estimates. While the net gain in migration was only 115, it contrasts starkly with annual losses that were regularly in the thousands and neared 20,000 two decades ago.

Another thing that caught my eye: “Over all, New York City’s population was estimated by the census last July at 8,336,697, a surge of 161,564 since 2010 — nearly as many as the city gained in the entire preceding decade.”

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On Friday, the New York Times ran a classically tunnel visioned New York Times feature, about what it means to be middle class in Manhattan. The Times would have you believe that to live in the Apple, you’re going to need about $235K a year to just hit that modest goal.

If you are defining…

Trenchant. What makes the NYT article that she cites even more problematic is that ran in the Real Estate section, where the emphasis is on upmarket, and there’s little journalistic examination of how the other 90 percent live. A real blind spot for the paper of record.

A Bangladeshi New Yorker has been accused of trying to carry out a terrorist plot: a car bomb attack on the Federal Reserve building.
This got us looking at the Bangladeshi community overall. Not because there is any apparent connection between the alleged terrorist, Quazi Nafis, and the community — simply because it’s a relatively under-reported community and is suddenly finding itself in the spotlight.
The big takeaway is that this is one of the city’s fastest-growing ethnic groups.
Between 2000 and 2010, the community grew by 119%
As of the 2010 Census count, there were 61,788 Bangladeshis in the city
The overall population places it well ahead of the Pakistani population, and just behind the Filipino community
Queens has by far the most Bangladeshis of any borough: 38,341

A Bangladeshi New Yorker has been accused of trying to carry out a terrorist plot: a car bomb attack on the Federal Reserve building.

This got us looking at the Bangladeshi community overall. Not because there is any apparent connection between the alleged terrorist, Quazi Nafis, and the community — simply because it’s a relatively under-reported community and is suddenly finding itself in the spotlight.

The big takeaway is that this is one of the city’s fastest-growing ethnic groups.

  • Between 2000 and 2010, the community grew by 119%
  • As of the 2010 Census count, there were 61,788 Bangladeshis in the city
  • The overall population places it well ahead of the Pakistani population, and just behind the Filipino community
  • Queens has by far the most Bangladeshis of any borough: 38,341