Elle’s Pharrell cover phail
“I respect and honor every kind of race, background and culture,” Pharrell says. “I am genuinely sorry.” [Buzzfeed]

Taino Ray: How can you do something so stupid and disrespectfulll.. you are not a Chief Pharrel.. The eagle feathers are sacred… Even if you are part Native the headdress is off limits… Its for Warriors and people of the plains culture.. You don’t have the right to wear that Pharrel… neither does Cher or Emerson Windy… You guys don’t get it…. You will learn the hard way by us Natives telling you so… [Indian Country]

Elle’s Pharrell cover phail

“I respect and honor every kind of race, background and culture,” Pharrell says. “I am genuinely sorry.” [Buzzfeed]

Taino Ray: How can you do something so stupid and disrespectfulll.. you are not a Chief Pharrel.. The eagle feathers are sacred… Even if you are part Native the headdress is off limits… Its for Warriors and people of the plains culture.. You don’t have the right to wear that Pharrel… neither does Cher or Emerson Windy… You guys don’t get it…. You will learn the hard way by us Natives telling you so… [Indian Country]

viagrastrong

This is a performance piece that’s generating a lot of heat and outrage but no real answers. I’m genuinely confused — what exactly is the artist’s objective? Based on some of the angry Tumblr comments I’m seeing, maybe it’s to show that women who dress a certain way are objectified. Or is it that BLACK women become spectacles when they enter rarefied environments like the Museum of Modern Art? Or is it just black women who dress provocatively? In which case I wonder how she’d be perceived in another space: would people in, say, the Bronx ignore her, or would they also take pictures? Unfortunately there’s no way for us to know, or for that matter, to see whether people are just as likely to take pictures of a MAN dressed like that. Or is the ultimate message just, “People, ask for permission before you take someone’s picture?” Good art often provokes a lot of questions but I don’t really feel provoked as much as manipulated, and annoyed.

viagrastrong:

ken-yadigit:

blackjatovia:

This video is revelatory. 

This was actually really interesting.

so like… I want to know the point behind this? what was trying to be proven and what did she expect to happen? I’m not tryna come off but like… what happened wasn’t surprising. at all.

Williamsburg Stores To Drop “No Sleeveless, No Low-Cut Necklines” Signs
In the past, I’ve looked at the benefits of homogeneity in certain neighborhoods — like Hasidic enclaves in Williamsburg. 
But there are clearly some problems as well, including the fortress mentality that can develop against outsiders, namely non-Hasidic women who aren’t bound by religious edicts on clothing. A couple years ago, the city sued seven Hasidic stores for posting signs that said “No shorts, no barefoot, no sleeveless, no low-cut necklines allowed in store,” saying that the stores were effectively discriminating against women, and on the basis of religion. 
That lawsuit has been settled.
The city dropped the $75,000 in collective fines it had demanded. In return, the stores have agreed to ease up.

The commissioner’s statement asserted that, according to “the proposed agreement, representatives from the stores agreed that if they were to post new signs in their windows, they would say that while modest dress is appreciated, all individuals are welcome to enter the stores free from discrimination.” [Agudath Israel]

Photo credit: group by Several seconds on Flickr.

Williamsburg Stores To Drop “No Sleeveless, No Low-Cut Necklines” Signs

In the past, I’ve looked at the benefits of homogeneity in certain neighborhoods — like Hasidic enclaves in Williamsburg. 

But there are clearly some problems as well, including the fortress mentality that can develop against outsiders, namely non-Hasidic women who aren’t bound by religious edicts on clothing. A couple years ago, the city sued seven Hasidic stores for posting signs that said “No shorts, no barefoot, no sleeveless, no low-cut necklines allowed in store,” saying that the stores were effectively discriminating against women, and on the basis of religion. 

That lawsuit has been settled.

The city dropped the $75,000 in collective fines it had demanded. In return, the stores have agreed to ease up.

The commissioner’s statement asserted that, according to “the proposed agreement, representatives from the stores agreed that if they were to post new signs in their windows, they would say that while modest dress is appreciated, all individuals are welcome to enter the stores free from discrimination.” [Agudath Israel]

Photo credit: group by Several seconds on Flickr.

Ladies, thinking of traveling to Pakistan or Egypt any time soon? Here’s a handy little infographic, from the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, telling you how the public in several Muslim-majority nations expects its women to dress in public.
People in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan appear to be the most conservative, with a solid majority of Saudis preferring everything but the eyes to be covered.
The Turkish and Lebanese public are far more liberal — half of the Lebanese people surveyed and a third of Turkey think it’s okay for a woman to not cover her head at all in public.
But there are some nuances here: in Tunisia, which prefers its women to cover their hair, 56% of the public says women should be free to decide for themselves.
More at Pew Research Center.

Ladies, thinking of traveling to Pakistan or Egypt any time soon? Here’s a handy little infographic, from the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research, telling you how the public in several Muslim-majority nations expects its women to dress in public.

People in Saudi Arabia and Pakistan appear to be the most conservative, with a solid majority of Saudis preferring everything but the eyes to be covered.

The Turkish and Lebanese public are far more liberal — half of the Lebanese people surveyed and a third of Turkey think it’s okay for a woman to not cover her head at all in public.

But there are some nuances here: in Tunisia, which prefers its women to cover their hair, 56% of the public says women should be free to decide for themselves.

More at Pew Research Center.

Is the Elle magazine cover of Mindy Kaling racist? Or size-ist?
On the face of it, I really don’t think so. 
A lot of people have noted that of all the women included in the magazine’s “Women in Television” covers — the others being Amy Poehler, Allison Williams, and Zooey Deschanel — Mindy is the only one in black & white. She’s also the only one who was closely cropped; the others were shown in full. 
This has led to arguments that Elle wasn’t willing to celebrate her dark skin, or was trying to hide the fact that she’s not skinny. 
But Amy Poehler isn’t exactly skinny either, and she was shown nearly head-to-toe.
And on the dark-skin issue, an earlier Elle cover girl, Sudanese supermodel Alek Wek was shown in color and is far darker than Mindy. 
The point isn’t that magazines like Elle are completely virtuous — they overwhelmingly showcase thin, white women — but that there are all sorts of editorial decisions that aren’t apparent to the public. 
More importantly, I think the Mindy cover is well done, it’s sexy, and it’s pretty obvious she’s a woman of color. Who’s on the cover of ELLE.

Is the Elle magazine cover of Mindy Kaling racist? Or size-ist?

On the face of it, I really don’t think so. 

A lot of people have noted that of all the women included in the magazine’s “Women in Television” covers — the others being Amy Poehler, Allison Williams, and Zooey Deschanel — Mindy is the only one in black & white. She’s also the only one who was closely cropped; the others were shown in full. 

This has led to arguments that Elle wasn’t willing to celebrate her dark skin, or was trying to hide the fact that she’s not skinny. 

But Amy Poehler isn’t exactly skinny either, and she was shown nearly head-to-toe.

And on the dark-skin issue, an earlier Elle cover girl, Sudanese supermodel Alek Wek was shown in color and is far darker than Mindy. 

The point isn’t that magazines like Elle are completely virtuous — they overwhelmingly showcase thin, white women — but that there are all sorts of editorial decisions that aren’t apparent to the public. 

More importantly, I think the Mindy cover is well done, it’s sexy, and it’s pretty obvious she’s a woman of color. Who’s on the cover of ELLE.

brooklyntheory
brooklyntheory:

Pull Up Your Pants No One Wants To See Your Underwear, Harlem, NYC

It’s true: No One wants to see your underwear. Of course, these signs were meant to be a little, er, cheeky, but in some towns politicians actually made it against the law to let your pants sag too low. The town of Delcambre, in Louisiana, threatened offenders with six months of jail time.
Here in New York, politicians like Eric Adams took a more forgiving route, running billboards proclaiming “Stop the Sag!” 

Another politician, Malcolm Smith, spent $2200 in campaign funds on anti-sag ads on the sides of buses. 
"I said my pants are up, my image is fine. I said you can be cool as well. This is the new cool, just raising your pants," said Smith, at a press conference I attended in 2010.
Ironically, Smith was just arrested last week — for allegedly trying to rig the New York City mayoral race. So he may not be the best role model after all.

brooklyntheory:

Pull Up Your Pants No One Wants To See Your Underwear, Harlem, NYC

It’s true: No One wants to see your underwear. Of course, these signs were meant to be a little, er, cheeky, but in some towns politicians actually made it against the law to let your pants sag too low. The town of Delcambre, in Louisiana, threatened offenders with six months of jail time.

Here in New York, politicians like Eric Adams took a more forgiving route, running billboards proclaiming “Stop the Sag!” 

Another politician, Malcolm Smith, spent $2200 in campaign funds on anti-sag ads on the sides of buses. 

"I said my pants are up, my image is fine. I said you can be cool as well. This is the new cool, just raising your pants," said Smith, at a press conference I attended in 2010.

Ironically, Smith was just arrested last week — for allegedly trying to rig the New York City mayoral race. So he may not be the best role model after all.

"Fashion Week’s Models are Getting Whiter"
That was the headline the other day at Jezebel, which came up with the graph above after some exhaustive research.
What’s up with New York Fashion Week?
In reporting on the issue myself, I realized that this isn’t just about a bunch of skinny women on runways. It’s about the very perception of wealth. In short, the faces that we see in ads for luxury products — makeup, handbags, sunglasses — are almost invariably white. Black and Hispanic ladies: good luck.
Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model who’s studied the issue, says high fashion is looking for girls who project youth, unattainability and a sort of sexual purity. Over the centuries, those qualities have come to be reinforced with whiteness in the West.
"Throughout colonial history, non-white women have often been marked as sexually deviant, hypersexual, sexually available," said Mears. "Not just women, but also men."
For black models, that means being repeatedly told they should get nose jobs, or that their rear ends are too big.
To be fair, some industry insiders take this seriously. But others, not so much. One designer who’s show I attended at Fashion Week was Nicole Miller. About a quarter of her models were non-white, and she had this to say.
"I had 5 diversified girls, plus a redhead," said Miller. "Which is the most diversity. Because the lowest percentage of the population is redheads. So you have to include them in the diversified group."
There you have it: redheads as women of color.

"Fashion Week’s Models are Getting Whiter"

That was the headline the other day at Jezebel, which came up with the graph above after some exhaustive research.

What’s up with New York Fashion Week?

In reporting on the issue myself, I realized that this isn’t just about a bunch of skinny women on runways. It’s about the very perception of wealth. In short, the faces that we see in ads for luxury products — makeup, handbags, sunglasses — are almost invariably white. Black and Hispanic ladies: good luck.

Ashley Mears, a sociologist and former model who’s studied the issue, says high fashion is looking for girls who project youth, unattainability and a sort of sexual purity. Over the centuries, those qualities have come to be reinforced with whiteness in the West.

"Throughout colonial history, non-white women have often been marked as sexually deviant, hypersexual, sexually available," said Mears. "Not just women, but also men."

For black models, that means being repeatedly told they should get nose jobs, or that their rear ends are too big.

To be fair, some industry insiders take this seriously. But others, not so much. One designer who’s show I attended at Fashion Week was Nicole Miller. About a quarter of her models were non-white, and she had this to say.

"I had 5 diversified girls, plus a redhead," said Miller. "Which is the most diversity. Because the lowest percentage of the population is redheads. So you have to include them in the diversified group."

There you have it: redheads as women of color.