theparisreview

theparisreview:

Checking out books on the subway? We can dig it! (And those bookshelf mock-ups would make a pleasant change from Dr. Zizmor ads, not that we don’t love him, too.)

Brilliant idea, meant for anyone who’s been on a long subway ride with nothing to read. But as it turns out, this is just a concept, and the New York Public Library has nothing to do with it, despite their logo being front and center.

The credit goes to students at the Miami Ad School. But the title of their project, “A Simple Solution to help New York’s Empty Libraries,” is flawed, because the libraries in this city aren’t empty at all.

Since 2008, NYPL circulation is up 44 percent, to 28 million. Attendance is up 12 percent, to 18 million. And computer usage is up 160 percent.

That said, Miami’s students are on to something here. NYPL, take note!

As if the death of a subway commuter, pushed onto the tracks, weren’t enough, we have the following to digest:According to DNA: “More than a minute — and possibly as long as 90 seconds — elapsed before the train slammed into him, a police source said. It was not immediately clear whether anyone on the platform tried to help Han to safety. ‘People were just standing in shock,’ said witness Patrick Gomez.” [DNA]Well, not everyone. Certainly not the photographer R. Umar Abbasi, whose image graces the New York Post’s controversial cover.According to the Post article, Abbasi claims he was “running” toward the victim, 58-year-old Ki-Suck Han, while simultaneously “firing off” his flash in order to alert the train. This narrative doesn’t really hold up, however, when you simply examine the photo.Does that image look as if it were taken in mid-sprint? To me it looks like a perfectly level, well-composed picture, taken by someone whose feet were planted pretty firm — a freelance photojournalist, as it turns out.

As if the death of a subway commuter, pushed onto the tracks, weren’t enough, we have the following to digest:

According to DNA: “More than a minute — and possibly as long as 90 seconds — elapsed before the train slammed into him, a police source said. It was not immediately clear whether anyone on the platform tried to help Han to safety. ‘People were just standing in shock,’ said witness Patrick Gomez.” [DNA]

Well, not everyone. Certainly not the photographer R. Umar Abbasi, whose image graces the New York Post’s controversial cover.

According to the Post article, Abbasi claims he was “running” toward the victim, 58-year-old Ki-Suck Han, while simultaneously “firing off” his flash in order to alert the train. This narrative doesn’t really hold up, however, when you simply examine the photo.

Does that image look as if it were taken in mid-sprint? To me it looks like a perfectly level, well-composed picture, taken by someone whose feet were planted pretty firm — a freelance photojournalist, as it turns out.

F train fracas

F train, entering Manhattan from Qns. 40-something, pleasant-enough white guy walks through, strumming guitar, 2 kids in tow.

10-yr-old son holds out dixie cup, hoping for cash. But 60-something Russian woman next to me, hair radioactive red, starts shouting at them.

How, she asks, can a father involve his own children in his panhandling ways?

"Terrible!" she hisses to anyone listening.

Dad and kids exit the subway car, but from the platform he turns back and makes a big, sad face.

And yet, my sympathies are divided.