flonyc
The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…
flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.
This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.
As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.

The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…

flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.

This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.

As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.

Williamsburg Stores To Drop “No Sleeveless, No Low-Cut Necklines” Signs
In the past, I’ve looked at the benefits of homogeneity in certain neighborhoods — like Hasidic enclaves in Williamsburg. 
But there are clearly some problems as well, including the fortress mentality that can develop against outsiders, namely non-Hasidic women who aren’t bound by religious edicts on clothing. A couple years ago, the city sued seven Hasidic stores for posting signs that said “No shorts, no barefoot, no sleeveless, no low-cut necklines allowed in store,” saying that the stores were effectively discriminating against women, and on the basis of religion. 
That lawsuit has been settled.
The city dropped the $75,000 in collective fines it had demanded. In return, the stores have agreed to ease up.

The commissioner’s statement asserted that, according to “the proposed agreement, representatives from the stores agreed that if they were to post new signs in their windows, they would say that while modest dress is appreciated, all individuals are welcome to enter the stores free from discrimination.” [Agudath Israel]

Photo credit: group by Several seconds on Flickr.

Williamsburg Stores To Drop “No Sleeveless, No Low-Cut Necklines” Signs

In the past, I’ve looked at the benefits of homogeneity in certain neighborhoods — like Hasidic enclaves in Williamsburg. 

But there are clearly some problems as well, including the fortress mentality that can develop against outsiders, namely non-Hasidic women who aren’t bound by religious edicts on clothing. A couple years ago, the city sued seven Hasidic stores for posting signs that said “No shorts, no barefoot, no sleeveless, no low-cut necklines allowed in store,” saying that the stores were effectively discriminating against women, and on the basis of religion. 

That lawsuit has been settled.

The city dropped the $75,000 in collective fines it had demanded. In return, the stores have agreed to ease up.

The commissioner’s statement asserted that, according to “the proposed agreement, representatives from the stores agreed that if they were to post new signs in their windows, they would say that while modest dress is appreciated, all individuals are welcome to enter the stores free from discrimination.” [Agudath Israel]

Photo credit: group by Several seconds on Flickr.

gabrielrobertflores
Will tech help lift New York City’s black and Hispanic communities? It’s certainly looking that way. 

Since 2010, the number of blacks working in computer and mathematical occupations — the Census Bureau’s term for tech-related jobs — in the city has risen by 19.7 percent, based on a preliminary analysis of new census data. Over the same stretch, the number of Hispanics in such occupations in New York City has risen by 25.4 percent. By comparison, non-Hispanic whites in computer and mathematical occupations experienced just a 6.4 percent gain since 2010. [NYT]

gabrielrobertflores:

Lower Manhattan, 4.5.2013

Will tech help lift New York City’s black and Hispanic communities? It’s certainly looking that way. 

Since 2010, the number of blacks working in computer and mathematical occupations — the Census Bureau’s term for tech-related jobs — in the city has risen by 19.7 percent, based on a preliminary analysis of new census data. Over the same stretch, the number of Hispanics in such occupations in New York City has risen by 25.4 percent. By comparison, non-Hispanic whites in computer and mathematical occupations experienced just a 6.4 percent gain since 2010. [NYT]

gabrielrobertflores:

Lower Manhattan, 4.5.2013


While diplomatically praising his old rival Ray Kelly, Bratton also noted that there were missed opportunities to curb stop-and-frisk….
“Cops themselves felt that they were in a no-win position. They had an administration, Mayor Bloomberg, Commissioner Kelly, who were demanding more and more and more. And the cops themselves felt, you know, it’s too much. And the community was saying it’s too much. It’s like a doctor giving too much chemotherapy: ‘Doctor I’m feeling better but you’re giving me all this chemo and I’m feeling worse again.’ ”

— The New York Times
Photo credit Spencer Platt/Getty Images

While diplomatically praising his old rival Ray Kelly, Bratton also noted that there were missed opportunities to curb stop-and-frisk….

“Cops themselves felt that they were in a no-win position. They had an administration, Mayor Bloomberg, Commissioner Kelly, who were demanding more and more and more. And the cops themselves felt, you know, it’s too much. And the community was saying it’s too much. It’s like a doctor giving too much chemotherapy: ‘Doctor I’m feeling better but you’re giving me all this chemo and I’m feeling worse again.’ ”

The New York Times

Photo credit Spencer Platt/Getty Images