There’s a growing black surf scene in the Rockaways. Guys like Louis Harris, above, or Brian James, aka “the Nautical Negro.” 
When James started surfing here in 1997, he said it was tough.
“Lot of racial epithets hurled out in water. Lot of arguing. But me personally, I let them know I wasn’t going for it. They got a problem, we can settle it on the beach.”
But now, it’s other black people who insist that “black people don’t surf.” 
Check out Stephen Nessen’s story at WNYC.

There’s a growing black surf scene in the Rockaways. Guys like Louis Harris, above, or Brian James, aka “the Nautical Negro.” 

When James started surfing here in 1997, he said it was tough.

“Lot of racial epithets hurled out in water. Lot of arguing. But me personally, I let them know I wasn’t going for it. They got a problem, we can settle it on the beach.”

But now, it’s other black people who insist that “black people don’t surf.” 

Check out Stephen Nessen’s story at WNYC.

PS 244, in Flushing, Queens, became the first public school in a major American city to offer an all-vegetarian menu. 

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott turned up to eat with the kids, though he could’ve probably looked a little happier, right?

On yesterday’s menu, above, were black bean and cheddar quesadillas with salsa and roasted potatoes.

Third graders who spoke with NY1 gave it rave reviews.

"When you’re healthy you can do better on tests, and you can fight more diseases," said one student in the cafeteria.

"It’s green so it can make your eyes better, and it can also help your muscles to become stronger, and it also has a lot of protein, not a lot of sugar," said another student. [link]

Other items on the menu include roasted chickpeas, braised black beans with plantains, tofu vegetable wrap with cucumber salad, vegetarian chili served with brown rice, falafel, and roasted tofu with Asian sesame sauce.

Photos by Kendall Rodriguez for the New York Daily News

brooklyntheory
brooklyntheory:

Pull Up Your Pants No One Wants To See Your Underwear, Harlem, NYC

It’s true: No One wants to see your underwear. Of course, these signs were meant to be a little, er, cheeky, but in some towns politicians actually made it against the law to let your pants sag too low. The town of Delcambre, in Louisiana, threatened offenders with six months of jail time.
Here in New York, politicians like Eric Adams took a more forgiving route, running billboards proclaiming “Stop the Sag!” 

Another politician, Malcolm Smith, spent $2200 in campaign funds on anti-sag ads on the sides of buses. 
"I said my pants are up, my image is fine. I said you can be cool as well. This is the new cool, just raising your pants," said Smith, at a press conference I attended in 2010.
Ironically, Smith was just arrested last week — for allegedly trying to rig the New York City mayoral race. So he may not be the best role model after all.

brooklyntheory:

Pull Up Your Pants No One Wants To See Your Underwear, Harlem, NYC

It’s true: No One wants to see your underwear. Of course, these signs were meant to be a little, er, cheeky, but in some towns politicians actually made it against the law to let your pants sag too low. The town of Delcambre, in Louisiana, threatened offenders with six months of jail time.

Here in New York, politicians like Eric Adams took a more forgiving route, running billboards proclaiming “Stop the Sag!” 

Another politician, Malcolm Smith, spent $2200 in campaign funds on anti-sag ads on the sides of buses. 

"I said my pants are up, my image is fine. I said you can be cool as well. This is the new cool, just raising your pants," said Smith, at a press conference I attended in 2010.

Ironically, Smith was just arrested last week — for allegedly trying to rig the New York City mayoral race. So he may not be the best role model after all.

chrisozer

chrisozer:

Hell Gate Bridge — February 2013

Most New Yorkers probably haven’t heard of the Hell Gate Bridge, but it’s kinda forlorn and beautiful and its single arch connects Queens to the Bronx. It’s said that if all human life disappeared from New York, the bridges would collapse within a few hundred years. But the Hell Gate would survive for a thousand.

dogpoopproject
The DOG POOP PROJECT, launched by art director Jang Cho, a resident of Astoria, Queens:

"The 32-year-old art director started snapping photos of dog poop around his neighborhood, then printed the pics on “Found” fliers, which he posts on lampposts and utility poles.
"If it’s yours, please call or e-mail me," the flier reads, providing a voicemail number and an email address — LostDogPoop@gmail.com — both of which auto-reply with a friendly public service announcement about the importance of curbing your dog.
"A poop-free Queens is a better Queens, for everyone," the message says. [DNAInfo]

BREAKING: Cho says the Dog Poop Project is headed to Brooklyn.
dogpoopproject:

Toilet Stencil 4

The DOG POOP PROJECT, launched by art director Jang Cho, a resident of Astoria, Queens:

"The 32-year-old art director started snapping photos of dog poop around his neighborhood, then printed the pics on “Found” fliers, which he posts on lampposts and utility poles.

"If it’s yours, please call or e-mail me," the flier reads, providing a voicemail number and an email address — LostDogPoop@gmail.com — both of which auto-reply with a friendly public service announcement about the importance of curbing your dog.

"A poop-free Queens is a better Queens, for everyone," the message says. [DNAInfo]

BREAKING: Cho says the Dog Poop Project is headed to Brooklyn.

dogpoopproject:

Toilet Stencil 4

The President and the Seamstress

Kazi Fouzia stitches clothes at her home in Jamaica, Queens. On Tuesday she’ll be waiting to hear what President Obama has to say to her and the other 11 million undocumented immigrants who live in this country when he makes his case for immigration reform.

"At this point, we’re not putting all our hopes up,” said Kazi (pictured above), who moved here from Bangladesh. For the last 4 years, Obama had made a lot of promises but didn’t follow through on them.”

We met at the offices of DRUM NYC — Desis Rising Up and Moving — where she acts as a worker organizer.

She used to work for someone in Jackson Heights, but he only paid her $50 for a day’s work.

"Desi owners" — South Asian employers — are like that, she told me, willing to exploit their own by threatening to turn them in to the immigration authorities. 

Minimum wage is $7.25 but five dollars an hour appears to be the norm for South Asian retail workers in Jackson Heights, according to a DRUM survey.

Pinky, who works at a retail store down the street, selling bangles, makes less than that, while putting in 12-hour days. If she didn’t have to be at work, she’d watch the president’s speech too.

"If real, genuine immigration reform does come through, we’ll be very happy," said Pinky, who arrived here from Bangladesh 12 years ago. "And even before going back to our own country, I’d like to go on Hajj [pilgrimage to Mecca]. Where I’d make prayer for Obama and all those people who fought to bring about this immigration reform."

In addition to traveling home, Pinky said she’d also look for better work; immigration reform could thus have an enormous impact on New York City’s economic landscape, as it would prevent many employers, South Asian or otherwise, from under-paying their workers.

Like Pinky, Kazi is hopeful that she’ll be able to travel freely — she lives apart from her son, in Bangladesh — and although she remembers the last time immigration reform came and went, she thinks the political climate is more promising this year.

"During the campaign Mitt Romney kept saying that every undocumented immigrant needs to leave the country," she said, an apparent reference to his calls for self-deportation. "But now their tone is markedly different."

Brooklyn wins, yet again.
Six out of every 10 people who buy Edwin Class’s I❤NY subway maps buy the one that says “Brooklyn” inside the big red heart. About three of every 10, he figured, buy the general, non-borough-specific map. And the rest is divvied up between Queens and the Bronx. Once in a very long, long while, someone asks him for a Staten Island edition.
—Union Square station

Brooklyn wins, yet again.

Six out of every 10 people who buy Edwin Class’s I❤NY subway maps buy the one that says “Brooklyn” inside the big red heart. About three of every 10, he figured, buy the general, non-borough-specific map. And the rest is divvied up between Queens and the Bronx. Once in a very long, long while, someone asks him for a Staten Island edition.

—Union Square station