Punishment or Child Abuse?

Powerful essay by Michael Eric Dyson in the NYT this morning, on the subject of black people (like Adrian Peterson) who beat their children on the pretext of disciplining them. 

"While 70 percent of Americans approve of corporal punishment, black Americans have a distinct history with the subject. Beating children has been a depressingly familiar habit in black families since our arrival in the New World. As the black psychiatrists William H. Grier and Price M. Cobbs wrote in “Black Rage,” their 1968 examination of psychological black life: “Beating in child-rearing actually has its psychological roots in slavery and even yet black parents will feel that, just as they have suffered beatings as children, so it is right that their children be so treated.”

The lash of the plantation overseer fell heavily on children to whip them into fear of white authority. Terror in the field often gave way to parents beating black children in the shack, or at times in the presence of the slave owner in forced cooperation to break a rebellious child’s spirit. Black parents beat their children to keep them from misbehaving in the eyes of whites who had the power to send black youth to their deaths for the slightest offense. Today, many black parents fear that a loose tongue or flash of temper could get their child killed by a trigger-happy cop. They would rather beat their offspring than bury them.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

On Sept. 9, 1971, the Attica Prison riot (Rebellion) began. 
As Howard Zinn explains in A People’s History of the United States: “The most direct effect of the George Jackson murder was the rebellion at Attica prison — a rebellion that came from long, deep grievances… . 54% of the inmates were black; 100% of the guards were white. Prisoners spent 14 to 16 hours a day in their cells, their mail was read, their reading material restricted, their visits from families conducted through a mesh screen, their medical care disgraceful, their parole system inequitable, racism everywhere.” 
Here are links to two primers on Attica and films for teaching outside the textbook about Attica: http://bit.ly/NiOWd6 
Image of Elliot L.D. Barkley by Katy Groves from the free, downloadable “Attica Uprising 101: A Short Primer” produced by Project NIA, see here: http://bit.ly/1qbKgt9
Via Zinn Education Project

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

On Sept. 9, 1971, the Attica Prison riot (Rebellion) began.

As Howard Zinn explains in A People’s History of the United States: “The most direct effect of the George Jackson murder was the rebellion at Attica prison — a rebellion that came from long, deep grievances… . 54% of the inmates were black; 100% of the guards were white. Prisoners spent 14 to 16 hours a day in their cells, their mail was read, their reading material restricted, their visits from families conducted through a mesh screen, their medical care disgraceful, their parole system inequitable, racism everywhere.”

Here are links to two primers on Attica and films for teaching outside the textbook about Attica: http://bit.ly/NiOWd6 

Image of Elliot L.D. Barkley by Katy Groves from the free, downloadable “Attica Uprising 101: A Short Primer” produced by Project NIA, see here: http://bit.ly/1qbKgt9

Via Zinn Education Project

turningpointsinwomenshistory
Love this shot. She’s like “Let’s pick up the pace, boys. I’ve got a power lunch, then a speech at the Rotary Club, and you know I can’t miss my three o clock nap.”
turningpointsinwomenshistory:

Birthday wishes are in order for Ruby Bridges. She was the first African American child to attend an all white school in the South. Parents of the other students pulled their kids from school and teachers refused to instruct while Ruby attended. At the age of six, Bridges bravely faced mobs of angry protesters who shouted insults and threatened her life. Her example demonstrates that anyone, of any age is capable of showing great courage and inspiring great change. Thanks to Ms. Magazine for the info

Love this shot. She’s like “Let’s pick up the pace, boys. I’ve got a power lunch, then a speech at the Rotary Club, and you know I can’t miss my three o clock nap.”

turningpointsinwomenshistory:

Birthday wishes are in order for Ruby Bridges. She was the first African American child to attend an all white school in the South. Parents of the other students pulled their kids from school and teachers refused to instruct while Ruby attended. At the age of six, Bridges bravely faced mobs of angry protesters who shouted insults and threatened her life. Her example demonstrates that anyone, of any age is capable of showing great courage and inspiring great change. Thanks to Ms. Magazine for the info

  • The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data.
  • The United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.
  • The black-white income gap is roughly 40 percent greater today than it was in 1967.

Read the rest: "When Whites Just Don’t Get It" by Nicholas Kristof

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 
But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.
“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”
He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

Mo’ne Davis was the 13-year-old star of the Little League World Series — even if her team didn’t make it all the way. When a lot of America was feeling depressed — or infuriated — by the images coming out of Ferguson, here was Davis, making it onto the cover of Sports Illustrated, the first girl to ever throw a shutout at the Series, quite possibly the first black girl to ever play in it. 

But there’s a powerful back story. Her coach is a white guy in his 50s who doesn’t just train the team in baseball but Jackie Robinson, the Negro Leagues and other aspects of U.S. race relations. 

His name is Steve Bandura. He brought Davis into baseball and for many years has coached her, as he has hundreds and hundreds of other inner-city Philadelphia kids going back to the 1990s, when he chucked a well-paying job in marketing to establish a baseball, basketball and soccer league for them.

“These kids had nothing,” Bandura, now 53, told me. “And you’re going to criticize them for getting into trouble when they have nothing to do?”

He was trying to give them focus, purpose, a point of entry to top high schools and colleges and a purchase on bigger, brighter futures. And he accomplished just that. Davis is an example: She’s now an honors student on a scholarship at a private school in an affluent Philadelphia neighborhood. [NYT]

I scored last-minute tickets to Dave Chappelle tomorrow night — the last in a series of 10 shows at Radio City. Feels a little unreal. I hardly ever go for live comedy shows and yet here I am, about to see one of the greatest comics of all time. From Vulture:

When I enter, I’m instantly and surprisingly overwhelmed with emotion. With a jazz trio called Supa Lowery Bros at the top of the stairs, playing an instrumental version of Kendrick Lamar’s oddly appropriate “Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe,” I’m taken by how incredibly eclectic and buzzing the crowd is. I’m not exaggerating when I say it is the most diverse room I’ve ever been in. It looks like the streets of New York City were moved inside. It looks like the cast of Orange Is the New Black if it were half male and everyone were allowed to wear their cutest outfits (and not just because I eventually sat two seats down from Natasha Lyonne). A young Asian guy wearing a hat with the New Yorker logo on it stands in line in front of a white guy in a Twiztid hat, an Indian guy in a suit, an African-American skater in a Obey hat, and a woman in dreads who was talking to a woman with a feather in her hair. This is why Chappelle’s run of ten shows needed to be here, at Radio City. It’s big enough that I could see how wide-reaching his fan base is, but not so big (like Madison Square Garden would’ve been) that we turned into a faceless blob just moving in and out of passageways. With the band now playing a jazzed-up version of a Kanye West song, it is all reminiscent of Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Chappelle’s 2006 concert documentary, which the comedian called the “best day of my career.”

But here’s the most interesting part…

Chappelle didn’t quit because he was crazy; he quit because he was sane, and he knew his audience was getting crazy. So, like a war of attrition, intentionally or not, Chappelle weeded the bad element out. After ten years, gone were the racists, the idiots, the bandwagon-jumpers, the people who shouted, “I’m Rick James, bitch” for no apparent reason. All the signs saying “NO heckling” weren’t necessary at Radio City. After a privately “pretty fucking good” and publicly tumultuous decade, the audience was most definitely ready to laugh with him.

I scored last-minute tickets to Dave Chappelle tomorrow night — the last in a series of 10 shows at Radio City. Feels a little unreal. I hardly ever go for live comedy shows and yet here I am, about to see one of the greatest comics of all time. From Vulture:

When I enter, I’m instantly and surprisingly overwhelmed with emotion. With a jazz trio called Supa Lowery Bros at the top of the stairs, playing an instrumental version of Kendrick Lamar’s oddly appropriate “Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe,” I’m taken by how incredibly eclectic and buzzing the crowd is. I’m not exaggerating when I say it is the most diverse room I’ve ever been in. It looks like the streets of New York City were moved inside. It looks like the cast of Orange Is the New Black if it were half male and everyone were allowed to wear their cutest outfits (and not just because I eventually sat two seats down from Natasha Lyonne). A young Asian guy wearing a hat with the New Yorker logo on it stands in line in front of a white guy in a Twiztid hat, an Indian guy in a suit, an African-American skater in a Obey hat, and a woman in dreads who was talking to a woman with a feather in her hair. This is why Chappelle’s run of ten shows needed to be here, at Radio City. It’s big enough that I could see how wide-reaching his fan base is, but not so big (like Madison Square Garden would’ve been) that we turned into a faceless blob just moving in and out of passageways. With the band now playing a jazzed-up version of a Kanye West song, it is all reminiscent of Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Chappelle’s 2006 concert documentary, which the comedian called the “best day of my career.”

But here’s the most interesting part…

Chappelle didn’t quit because he was crazy; he quit because he was sane, and he knew his audience was getting crazy. So, like a war of attrition, intentionally or not, Chappelle weeded the bad element out. After ten years, gone were the racists, the idiots, the bandwagon-jumpers, the people who shouted, “I’m Rick James, bitch” for no apparent reason. All the signs saying “NO heckling” weren’t necessary at Radio City. After a privately “pretty fucking good” and publicly tumultuous decade, the audience was most definitely ready to laugh with him.

flonyc
The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…
flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.
This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.
As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.

The First Lady of NYC Chirlane McCray — aka Mrs. Bill de Blasio / Dante’s mom — on the impending move into Gracie Mansion and the items they’ll be taking with them, including home-made black dolls…

flonyc:

When I was a little girl, my mother lamented that there were so few Black dolls available for us. She was determined to do something about it. It took time, but later in her life, undeterred, she sat down at this sewing machine (where she had sewn many of our clothes) and created dolls that reflected what my sisters and I saw in the mirror every day.

This special set of dolls represents me and my sisters. Look, I’m the one in the middle, with a nose ring, just like the one I used to have.

As much as I cherish these dolls, I’m even more grateful for the knowledge my Mom passed along to me. With her guidance, I learned to sew.

The worldwide market for skin lighteners is expected to hit $20 billion in 2018.
Lighteners were developed in the U.S. during Reconstruction, by former slaves who wanted to get better jobs. Even as late as the mid-20th century, civil rights leaders like Walter White of the NAACP thought lighteners would end racial discrimination because black people could suddenly look white. Instead, the products moved into sub-Saharan Africa as well as East and South Asia and lightening became a way of life.
On a recent morning, I found Dilshad Jiwani at an Indian supermarket in Queens. She was buying a bottle of Fair and Lovely, the world’s #1 brand of skin lightener, according to the company, used by one in 10 women globally.
"People look at you differently if your skin color is different. Especially in America, because they’re fair and we have dark skin, so we’re treated badly. So I want to look fair too."
Jiwani said that in the past, people in the subway would get up and move away from her because she was darker. “It feels like insult!” she said. “They did that to me, and I felt bad. Now, since I’m white, they don’t do that.”
Listen to the full Micropolis segment on skin lightening across cultures, and how dark women like Lupita Nyong’o are tackling the problem of colorism.
Skintone-Pantone chart by Angelica Dass.

The worldwide market for skin lighteners is expected to hit $20 billion in 2018.

Lighteners were developed in the U.S. during Reconstruction, by former slaves who wanted to get better jobs. Even as late as the mid-20th century, civil rights leaders like Walter White of the NAACP thought lighteners would end racial discrimination because black people could suddenly look white. Instead, the products moved into sub-Saharan Africa as well as East and South Asia and lightening became a way of life.

On a recent morning, I found Dilshad Jiwani at an Indian supermarket in Queens. She was buying a bottle of Fair and Lovely, the world’s #1 brand of skin lightener, according to the company, used by one in 10 women globally.

"People look at you differently if your skin color is different. Especially in America, because they’re fair and we have dark skin, so we’re treated badly. So I want to look fair too."

Jiwani said that in the past, people in the subway would get up and move away from her because she was darker. “It feels like insult!” she said. “They did that to me, and I felt bad. Now, since I’m white, they don’t do that.”

Listen to the full Micropolis segment on skin lightening across cultures, and how dark women like Lupita Nyong’o are tackling the problem of colorism.

Skintone-Pantone chart by Angelica Dass.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…
In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:
“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”
“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.”
Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

Neil deGrasse Tyson on being profiled as a kid…

In response to a question, about whether genetic differences might explain why there are fewer women than men in science, he recounted this episode from his childhood:

“I walked out of a store one time, and the alarm went off, and so they came running to me. I walked through the gate at the same time a white male walked through the gate. And that guy just walked off with the stolen goods, KNOWING they would’ve stopped me and not him. That’s an interesting sort of exploitation – what a scam that was.”

“So my life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks in the sciences, you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today. So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity. Then we can have that conversation.

Scroll to an hour and two minutes into the video.

retronewyork
Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.
Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”
But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 
retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964
photo by Garry Winogrand

Fifty years ago, the World’s Fair opened on a former garbage-dump in Queens, drawing over 50 million people. For most of those attendees, race relations was probably the last thing on their mind, which is exactly why protesters crashed the party, repeatedly, and made the Fair a battleground for civil rights.

Groups like the Congress for Racial Equality organized demonstrations, resulting in hundreds of arrests. Some were there to protest the discriminatory hiring policies of companies exhibiting at the Fair, or to goad President Johnson, who spoke at the opening, into helping pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Opposition to the act was intense. On March 30, just three weeks before the Fair opened, Senator Richard Russell (D-GA) declared during a filibuster, ”We will resist to the bitter end any measure or any movement which would have a tendency to bring about social equality and intermingling and amalgamation of the races in our (Southern) states.”

But it wasn’t enough. The Civil Rights Act was passed by Congress, and in July, LBJ signed it into law. 

retronewyork:

World’s Fair New York 1964

photo by Garry Winogrand

What’s the social value of making fun of people?

In their new Time magazine cover article, "The Case for Mockery," Key and Peele argue that political correctness has overrun American culture, and that mocking people — even the most vulnerable or maligned members of society — helps pull them in from the sidelines, and into “the greater human conversation.” 

"When a humorist makes the conscious decision to exclude a group from derision, isn’t he or she implying that the members of that group are not capable of self-reflection? Or don’t possess the mental faculties to recognize the nuances of satire? A group that’s excluded never gets the opportunity to join in the greater human conversation.

"Luckily, a lot of people get this–at least when it comes to their own cultures. Like the burn victim in our sketch, they plead, ‘You skipped me! Do me!’"

viagrastrong

This is a performance piece that’s generating a lot of heat and outrage but no real answers. I’m genuinely confused — what exactly is the artist’s objective? Based on some of the angry Tumblr comments I’m seeing, maybe it’s to show that women who dress a certain way are objectified. Or is it that BLACK women become spectacles when they enter rarefied environments like the Museum of Modern Art? Or is it just black women who dress provocatively? In which case I wonder how she’d be perceived in another space: would people in, say, the Bronx ignore her, or would they also take pictures? Unfortunately there’s no way for us to know, or for that matter, to see whether people are just as likely to take pictures of a MAN dressed like that. Or is the ultimate message just, “People, ask for permission before you take someone’s picture?” Good art often provokes a lot of questions but I don’t really feel provoked as much as manipulated, and annoyed.

viagrastrong:

ken-yadigit:

blackjatovia:

This video is revelatory. 

This was actually really interesting.

so like… I want to know the point behind this? what was trying to be proven and what did she expect to happen? I’m not tryna come off but like… what happened wasn’t surprising. at all.